What is “YOUR” Writing Style?

Definition of Style

The style in writing can be defined as the way a writer writes. It is the technique that an individual author uses in his writing. It varies from author to author, and depends upon one’s syntax, word choice, and tone. It can also be described as a “voice” that readers listen to when they read the work of a writer.

Types of Style

There are four basic literary styles used in writing. These styles distinguish the works of different authors, one from another. Here are four styles of writing:

Expository or Argumentative Style

Expository writing style is a subject-oriented style. The focus of the writer in this type of writing style is to tell the readers about a specific subject or topic, and in the end the author leaves out his own opinion about that topic.

Descriptive Style

In descriptive writing style, the author focuses on describing an event, a character or a place in detail. Sometimes, descriptive writing style is poetic in nature in, where the author specifies an event, an object, or a thing rather than merely giving information about an event that has happened. Usually the description incorporates sensory details.

Persuasive Style

Persuasive style of writing is a category of writing in which the writer tries to give reasons and justification to make the readers believe his point of view. The persuasive style aims to persuade and convince the readers.

Narrative Style

Narrative writing style is a type of writing wherein the writer narrates a story. It includes short stories, novels, novellas, biographies, and poetry.

Short Examples of Style in Sentences

  1. If it sounds like I’m writing, then I prefer to rewrite it.
    (Conversational)
  2. “I think it’s a good ide,.” said Jenny.
    “You can imagine the outcomes!” retorted Emma, pushing the door open.
    Reluctantly, Jenny followed.
    (Narrative)
  3. The sunset fills the entire sky with the lovely deep color of rubies, setting the clouds ablaze.
    (Descriptive)
  4. The waves waltz along the seashore, going up and down in a gentle and graceful rhythm, like dancing.
    (Descriptive)
  5. A trip to Switzerland is an excellent experience that you will never forget, offering beautiful nature, fun, and sun. Book your vacation trip today.
    (Persuasive)
  6. She hears a hoarse voice, and sees a shadow moving around the balcony. As it moves closer to her, she screams to see a gigantic wolf standing before her.
    (Narrative)
  7. From the garden, the child plucks a delicate rose, touching and cradling it gently as if it is a precious jewel.
    (Descriptive)
  8. What if you vote for me? I ensure you that your taxes will be very low, the government will provide free education, and there will be equality and justice for all citizens. Cast your vote for me today.
    (Persuasive)
  9. The deep blue color of the cat’s eyes is like ocean water on the clearest day you could ever imagine.
    (Descriptive)
  10. The soft hair of my cat feels silky, and her black color sparkles as it reflects sunlight.
    (Descriptive)
  11. This painting has blooming flowers, rich and deep blues on vibrant green stems, begging me to pick them.
    (Descriptive)
  12. Our criminal investigators are famous for recovering clients’ assets, as we not only take your cases but represent truly your interests.
    (Persuasive)
  13. Our headache medicines will give you relief for ten hours, with only one pill – and without any side effects. Try it today.
    (Persuasive)
  14. Tax raising strategy is wrong because it will cripple businesses. We should reduce taxes to boost growth.
    (Persuasive)

Examples of Style in Literature

Here are some examples of different writing styles from literature:

Example #1: The Pleasures of Imagination (By Joseph Addison)

“The pleasures of the imagination, taken in their full extent, are not so gross as those of sense. … A man of polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures … A man should endeavour, therefore, to make the sphere of his innocent pleasures as wide as possible, that he may retire into them with safety … Delightful scenes, whether in nature, painting, or poetry, have a kindly influence on the body, as well as the mind, and not only serve to clear and brighten the imagination, but are able to disperse grief and melancholy …”

This is an example of expository writing style, in which the author describes advantages of imagination with facts and logical sequence, and tells his delight of imagination. Then, he discusses its benefits and finally gives opinions in its favor.

Example #2: Summer Shower (By Emily Dickinson)

“A drop fell on the apple tree,
Another on the roof,
And made the gables laugh,
The breezes brought dejected lutes,
And bathed them in the glee;
And signed the fete away.”

This poem gives an example of descriptive style. Ms. Dickinson describes a summer rainstorm in detail, with beautiful images, so that the readers can visualize this storm in their own minds as if it is actually happening.

Example #3: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (By Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

“It is an ancient Mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.’
By thy long grey beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp’st thou me?
The bridegroom’s doors are opened wide,

The guests are met, the feast is set:
Mayst hear the merry din.”

In this poem, Coleridge uses narrative style, as he tells a story about the ancient mariner. He uses dialogues, disputes, actions, and events in a sequence, thus providing a perfect example of the narrative style of writing.

Example #4: Dorian Gray (By Oscar Wilde)

“The studio was filled with the rich odor of roses, and when the light summer wind stirred amidst the trees of the garden… The sullen murmur of the bees shouldering their way through… or circling with monotonous insistence…”

This is a good example of descriptive writing style since the author gives visualizations, feelings, description of a location and details about bees that could be seen and heard.

Example #5: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (By Mark Twain)

“Pretty soon it darkened up and begun to thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it … and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves …”

Here, Twain has demonstrated a narrative style, as well as used colloquial words in presenting this passage, as expressed through the voice of a young Southern-American boy.

Example #6: The Raven (By Edgar Allen Poe)

“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary…

And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted – nevermore!”

Here, the poet crafts a story of longing and desolation. The poem reads like a tale, containing a proper beginning, middle, and end. It has narrative elements like characterization, symbols, plot elements, and resolution that make it dramatic.

Example #7: Smoke (By Henry David Thoreau)

“Light-winged Smoke! Icarian bird,
Melting thy pinions in thy upward flight;
Lark without song, and messenger of dawn,
Circling above the hamlets as thy nest;
Or else, departing dream, and shadowy form
Of midnight vision, gathering up thy skirts;
By night star-veiling, and by day
Darkening the light and blotting out the sun;
Go thou, my incense, upward from this hearth,
And ask the gods to pardon this clear flame.”

Thoreau describes the intensity of the smoke that helps form a colorful image in the minds of the readers. He uses metaphor to compare smoke to “incense,” or an “Icarian bird.” He also describes “star-veiling” and “shadowy” and let the readers imagine smoke.

Function of Style

A unique literary style can have great impact on the piece in which it is used, and on the readers. When authors write and put their ideas into words, they have many choices to make, which include: words, sounds, logic, sentence structures. However, different authors use different literary styles that depend on their distinct expression, and their utilization of these choices. And their choices create their niche.

The topic of “Autism” is a tough one

What is Autism?

There is no, “One” type of Autism, but, “Many”.

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. According to the Centers for Disease Control, autism affects an estimated 1 in 59 children in the United States today.

We know that there is not one autism but many subtypes, most influenced by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Because autism is a spectrum disorder, each person with autism has a distinct set of strengths and challenges. The ways in which people with autism learn, think and problem-solve can range from highly skilled to severely challenged. Some people with ASD may require significant support in their daily lives, while others may need less support and, in some cases, live entirely independently.

Several factors may influence the development of autism, and it is often accompanied by sensory sensitivities and medical issues such as gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, seizures or sleep disorders, as well as mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression and attention issues.

Learn the Signs of Autism.

One of the most important things you can do as a parent or caregiver is to learn the early signs of autism and become familiar with the typical developmental milestones that your child should be reaching.

What are the signs of autism?

The timing and intensity of autism’s early signs vary widely. Some infants show hints in their first months. In others, behaviors become obvious as late as age 2 or 3.

Not all children with autism show all the signs. Many children who don’t have autism show a few. That’s why professional evaluation is crucial.

The following may indicate your child is at risk for an autism spectrum disorder. If your child exhibits any of the following, ask your pediatrician or family doctor for an evaluation right away:

By 6 months

  • Few or no big smiles or other warm, joyful and engaging expressions
  • Limited or no eye contact

By 9 months

  • Little or no back-and-forth sharing of sounds, smiles or other facial expressions

By 12 months

  • Little or no babbling
  • Little or no back-and-forth gestures such as pointing, showing, reaching or waving
  • Little or no response to name

By 16 months

  • Very few or no words

By 24 months

  • Very few or no meaningful, two-word phrases (not including imitating or repeating)

At any age

  • Loss of previously acquired speech, babbling or social skills
  • Avoidance of eye contact
  • Persistent preference for solitude
  • Difficulty understanding other people’s feelings
  • Delayed language development
  • Persistent repetition of words or phrases (echolalia)
  • Resistance to minor changes in routine or surroundings
  • Restricted interests
  • Repetitive behaviors (flapping, rocking, spinning, etc.)
  • Unusual and intense reactions to sounds, smells, tastes, textures, lights and/or colors

Indicators of autism usually appear by age 2 or 3. Some associated development delays can appear even earlier, and often, it can be diagnosed as early as 18 months. Research shows that early intervention leads to positive outcomes later in life for people with autism.

Beginning a Brand New Adventure…

So, going on a month, a new adventure began for me. I have taken the position as a Sales Consultant for Power Chevrolet, which is part of the Power Auto Group in the State of Oregon. Power Chevrolet is located in Sublimity, OR. Which is about 12 miles East of Salem, OR, right off Highway 22, take Exit 13 and turn left, then turn left on Sublimity BLVD. We are at the end of the road.

Power Chevrolet – Sublimity, OR

This is all very new territory for me! I have been used to selling trips on private jets, now, selling vehicles to clients who need road transportation. It really has been enjoyable learning this new job. Working closely with people of all walks of life.

Yes, we are a Chevrolet Dealership and we sell both new and used Chevrolets, however, we also sell, pretty much all vehicles that are available to the market place.

We have an amazing selection of trucks.

I have been here for about a month and have been learning alot about the Chevrolet Product and about vehicles and trucks in general.

When a client asks me a question, and if I don’t readily have the answer, I tell them, I’m not sure, but give me a minute and will look into that for you and have an answer for your shortly.

Just being myself, and learning how to sell cars and trucks, it has proven to be a rewarding experience for me. Getting to know people in the local area. And even selling to people at a distance. Sold a Mazda 5 to a lady in Eugene. She saw the car online, called and the next day, we delivered the car to her. It was a great and fun experience.

The two vehicles below, are a couple of little sporty cars that I had the opportunity to sell. The cars were very nice, awesome!, actually and the clients were a blast! They were just all around fun people to work with.

2018 Honda Civic
2012 Dodge Challenger

If you find yourself in the market for the need for a new vehicle, please, keep me in mind, or if you hear of a friend or family member who may need a vehicle, please drop my name if you would, that would be great appreciated.

#powerchevrolet;#findyourroad;#chevroletbyalex